Europe’s best destinations for thrill-seeking travelers

Adventure holidays are becoming more and more popular but often can be a case of doing the same thing just in a different location. Europe has many thrilling destinations that are just waiting to be discovered and explored, with a variety of things to do to keep the adrenaline pumping. These are some of the best destinations in Europe for a thrill-seeking adventurer to visit.

Lagos – Portugal

image via flickr

Kayaking is often a go-to for many thrill-seekers, and in Lagos, Portugal, those searching for that thrill won’t be left disappointed. Visitors to Lagos can expect to try blokarting (sailing on land), 4×4 safaris, sea kayaking and even rock climbing. Many of these activities are readily available and are no further than a short trip away, about an hour, for those staying in Lagos. All of that plus it is considered to be one of the best party locations in Europe (and the world). There really is something for everyone here.

Dog Sledding in Sweden

image via pixabay

For something a little different, you could try dog sledding in Sweden. While you may not be too familiar with making a pack of dogs pull you around a snowy landscape, you don’t have to be an expert to take up this activity. You’ll need to make sure you bring plenty of warm clothing though as you are likely to get very cold otherwise. Although you’ll have a guide to help you, it will feel like it is just you and the dogs after a while. Soon you’ll be navigating your way through tricky routes watching the snowy landscape whirring by. Then you’ll have a break and get to chill with the dogs for a bit, what could be better?

Be at one with the ice – Iceland

image via pixabay

Here you can climb beautifully blue ice structures as well as taking a jeep out at night to try and capture the natural phenomenon that is the northern lights. Iceland has lots to offer those who travel there, and you won’t be surprised to know there is an abundance of ice there. It is also the setting of many scenes in the HBO TV series Game of Thrones, so fans of the show can transport themselves beyond the wall and into the Wildling’s country.  

Diving in Scotland

image viawikimedia

Near the islands off the coast of mainland Scotland are some hidden treasures under the water. Heading to the Orkney Islands with your diving gear will bring history to life as there are some sunken warships ready for exploration should you have the diving skill. In fairness, they are just ten meters below the surface so many divers will have the capabilities of entering these abandoned ships. They were sunk to protect the services of the British Navy by blocking access to their would-be attackers. Visit the shores of Scotland if you’d like to throw in a bit of history with your adventure.

Zipwire in Italy

image via pixabay

Head to 2019’s European Capital of Culture and zip wire across its skyline. A zip wire that is almost a mile long connects two villages from high above in this mountainous region of Basilicata. Dubbed the “Flight of the Angel,” this will be the highlight of your adventure holiday in the mountains of Italy’s south. Rides along the zip wire will only set you back around €30, so it is well worth the entry fee. You can take a trek up into the mountains afterward and visit the rock churches that are carved into the rock face of the mountain.

Those were some of the best adventure destinations for those seeking a thrill in Europe. Hopefully, you’ve added one or two destinations to your list. Let us know in the comments your experiences of these places or any places you think we missed out.


This post was a guest post written by Jack Flynn – an avid traveller originally from London, but now spending time travelling in Europe and beyond. Currently situated in Spain, he writes for a few travel blogs whilst seeing the world of his own accord.

Alphabet dating Q is for quad biking

Alphabet Dating – Q is for Quad Biking

Just what do you do for Alphabet Dating letter Q? Well here’s an idea… QUAD BIKING!

Both newbies to Quad Biking, hubby and I headed up to Tulley’s Farm in West Sussex, home to Southern Pursuits – the ultimate destination for adrenaline-fuelled activity days in the South East of England.

Before we got going on the Quad Bikes, we had a go at archery because neither of us had really tried that before either, plus Southern Pursuits have quite a few activities to choose from, be it archery, quad biking, clay pigeon shooting, air rifles or even axe throwing! (hey if you’re thinking about starting up Alphabet Dating then there’s plenty of ‘A’ date ideas right here!).

Archery at Southern Pursuits - just a short drive from Gatwick airport

Archery was fun but SO TIRING! Particularly for me as I have the upper body strength of a toddler! Hubby did quite well at it, however my archery skills won’t have Katniss Everdeen quaking in her boots anytime soon.

Next up for us was the main event – quad biking! We were quite fortunate that it was just the two of us, plus our patient and friendly instructor Tom. We were briefed on all the safety instructions, shown how to control the bikes and then we were on our way around the nursery track. The quad bikes were alot more powerful than I expected them to be so I felt a little nervous at the beginning. Southern Pursuits actually use powerful Yamaha 350cc quad bikes whereas most activity centres like this only use 125cc bikes.

Driving on the nursery track at Southern Pursuits quad biking day.

However, once we were off the nursery track and into the woods my nerves vanished and I was having a great time! We drove through the trees, along muddy paths, up hills, down hills and through big puddles. By some sort of miracle only my boots got dirty, not sure how I managed that but we had brought along some spare clothes and shoes for the journey home just incase.

Muddy quad biking at Southern Pursuits

Alphabet dating letter Q

The team at Southern Pursuits were all friendly, fun and professional and the place itself is a great day out for stags, hens, team building events or just those looking for alphabet dating letter Q ideas. It’s also just a short drive from Gatwick so great for tourists too.

Quad biking starts at £45pp + VAT and archery is from £17.50pp + VAT but there are package deals to be had too.

Quad biking fun at Southern Pursuits

Disclaimer: we were invited by Southern Pursuits to try out their activities, but all words and opinions are my own. Photography courtesy of Southern Pursuits.

8 things to do in and around Queenstown New Zealand

8 things to do in and around Queenstown New Zealand

Queenstown is a must-do on anyone’s South Island itinerary, after all its not the adventure capital of New Zealand for nothing! Of course, there are TONS of things to do there, but here are 8 of my recommendations…

 1. Ride the gondola

Although Queenstown is famed for its fun and adventure, lets not forget that this is New Zealand, meaning that it is also quite pretty. The best way to take advantage of all that scenic beauty is to ride the gondola, which is STEEP (it’s actually the steepest cable car lift in the Southern hemisphere!) but so worth it when you reach the top and take in those gorgeous views.

Skyline gondola Queenstown

2. Have fun on the luge

Once you’ve ridden the gondola up to Bob’s Peak, you may as well enjoy some of the activities on offer up there. My recommendation is the luge – so much fun! You take a chair lift up even higher and then pick one of the two luge tracks to travel back down. There’s a more gentle, scenic track which everyone must do on their first ride and then there’s also a faster paced, steeper track. We ended up riding the luge 5 times!

Luge track in Queenstown New Zealand

3. Try a famous Fergburger

If you read my post about 3 fast food burgers you must try in New Zealand then you will already know about Fergburger. Although to be fair, you probably already know about Fergburger because literally anyone who has been to Queenstown has raved about this place. It’s not really “fast food” as you’ll probably be queuing about 45 minutes for it but it’s still worth trying at least once. Or twice in my case.

Burger and fries at the legendary Fergburger

4. Go horseriding

45 minutes drive from Queenstown is the town of Glenorchy, home to Dart Stables where we admired yet more of New Zealand’s beauty but on horse back. We did the beginners trek named Hobbit’s Hack and saw where some of Lord of the Rings was filmed. I can’t claim to be a LOTR fan but I did enjoy the scenery.

Horse riding in Glenorchy New Zealand

5. Spin and splash on the Shotover Jet

The Shotover Jet is quite simply, a jet boat ride on the Shotover River. Running since 1965, they are the only company permitted to operate within the Shotover River’s canyons. High speeds and 360 spins are guaranteed – you might even see rainbows in the mist!

Shotover jet boat ride in Queenstown, New Zealand

6. Bungy jump

So I have a small confession to make… I didn’t actually do a bungy jump because I don’t have that part of my brain that makes me want to pay $195 to tie a rubber band to my legs and throw myself off a bridge. However, my husband is a bit of a secret adrenalin junkie and did the AJ Hackett Kawarau Bridge jump in Queenstown – the world’s first commercial bungy jump.

He loved it and wouldn’t let me write this list without including it!

Bungy jumping on the Kawarau Bridge in Queenstown, New Zealand

7. Visit wonderful Wanaka

We only spent one day in Wanaka which really wasn’t enough. It was pretty and peaceful and we enjoyed a lovely lunch by the lake. It’s also home to two fabulously quirky attractions – Puzzling World and Cinema Paradiso. If you want to know a bit more about Wanaka then take a look at my post Quirky things to do in wonderful Wanaka.

Quirky Wanaka New Zealand - Puzzling World!

8. Take a day trip to Milford Sound

I admit this might be an odd choice given that my trip to Milford Sound was my worst day travelling but I know other people who have been there and had a great time. I can’t say more than that. Go read my post Milford Sound – is it worth it? and decide for yourself on this one.

Milford Sound - is it worth it?
Milford Sound – image not my own unfortunately. Image via Unsplash.

Have you been to Queenstown? What was your favourite thing to do? Comment below. And for more inspiration, follow my New Zealand Pinterest Board.

Pin it!

8 things to do in and around Queenstown New Zealand

Cuba Beyond the Beaches and Havana

Cuban Crocodiles, Sugar and Steam Trains

We decided that it would be nice to see a bit more of Cuba without venturing too far from Varadero, and so we booked a tour to see a sugar mill with steam trains, as well as a crocodile farm and a replica indigenous village on the Zapata Peninsula.

Is this Cuba? It certainly is!
Zapata Peninsula

I’m sure the more intrepid of travel bloggers would have hitch-hiked their way there, but bugger that! I went for the easy and comfortable option of an air conditioned mini bus! The heat and humidity are almost unbearable if you are away from air conditioning or a swimming pool for too long.

Steam train at a sugar mill in Cuba
Ride a steam train at the sugar mill

The first step was the sugar mill museum where we learnt how sugar is produced and then tasted some sugar cane juice. It tasted very sweet (as you would imagine) but also had a ‘rooty’ kind of taste I can’t describe. Afterwards we took a little ride on one of the several steam trains they had there.

Take a tour of a sugar mill in Cuba for something beyond the beaches and Havana
Take a tour of a sugar mill in Cuba

Next step was the crocodile farm in Boca de Guama where we got to see the famous Cuban crocodile, from teeny babies to giant beasts. The Cuban crocodile can grow up to a whopping 5 metres in length although the ones we saw weren’t quite as big as this.

Famous Cuban Crocodiles
Cuban crocodiles!

We also got to see a few more of Cuba’s famous animals – iguanas, turtles and jutia, an endangered mammal that reminded me alot of the quokkas on Rottnest Island in Australia.

Jutia - large rodent of Cuba
Jutia

After lunch at a Paladar (private restaurant), we headed back to where the crocodile farm was situated to catch a boat across Laguna del Tesoro (Treasure Lagoon). The lagoon was named for the gold that the Taino (aboriginals) supposedly hid in its waters. The boat ride took around 20 minutes and was a joy to feel the wind in my hair!

Boat ride on the Treasure Lagoon in the Zapata Peninsula
Treasure Lagoon

When we arrived we could walk around a replica Taino village, where people can actually stay although to be honest, besides a bar and a couple of gift shops, there’s not alot else there.

Once we’d got the boat back across the lagoon we headed back to Varadero (which took just over an hour and a half) and jumped straight into the hotel pool!

Replica Taino Village in Cuba
Replica Taino Village
Replica Taino village in Cuba
Replica Taino Village

I would love to have seen a bit more of Cuba’s native creatures (flamingos live in the Zapata Peninsula although we didn’t get to see them) but I enjoyed my day of seeing a bit more of Cuba beyond the beaches.

Liked this? How about 24 hours in Havana?

A beginners guide to Geocaching

Now we’re finally seeing the signs of summer here in England, it’s great to get out and about in the sunshine. So put down the Pokemon Go and listen up, kids – I’ve got a real treasure hunt for you… Geocaching!

A beginners guide to geocaching

What is Geocaching?

Geocaching is a “real-world, outdoor treasure hunting game using GPS enabled devices”.

What you need

  • A mobile phone with Geocaching app. There is a free version which is quite limited and a paid for subscription which, although pricey is alot more accurate and shows alot more caches available.
  • A pen for writing in log books
  • Trinkets and toys for swapping (optional)
  • Gloves – i.e. garden gloves for if you need to put your hand into a bush or something (optional)
  • A good pair of eyes!

a beginners guide to geocaching

How to play

  1. Download the app and register as a player. The username you assign yourself will be what you sign in the log books that you find.
  2. Switch on your GPS and use the app to discover just how many geocaches are near you.
  3. Once you’ve chosen a cache to find, follow the compass on the app to head to the location. Read the clues as to what you are looking for and get searching!
  4. Once you locate the cache, sign your username and the date in the log book. If you take any of the “treasure” inside the cache, be sure to replace it with something of equal or greater value.
  5. Put the cache back where you found it and don’t forget to mark on your app that you found it. Also leave a little comment for the person who created the cache, as well as future geocachers, to let them know what you thought of it.

Signing the log book in a geocache

Terminology

Cache – A cache can be as big as a lunchbox or as small as a USB stick. A cache is the “treasure chest” so to speak.
Log Book – Usually a piece of paper rather than a book. Sign this when you locate a cache.
Muggle – Like the term from Harry Potter, muggle refers to non-geocachers. When geocaching, try not to reveal a cache to a muggle. Keep it secret – it’s more fun!
Swag – Trade items left in caches. Most are cheap plastic toys and tat but some might be trackables. Most caches are too small for swag anyway.
Trackables – Also known as Travel Bugs, these are specially purchased trackable tags which are tracked online at geocaching.com. If you find one, the idea is to move it on to another cache so it can travel around.
DNF – Did Not Find. If you see this a few times on the app for a particular cache, chances are the cache has been tampered with unbeknownst to the cache creator.
FTF – First To Find. Pretty obvious – written by the first person to find the cache.
TFTC – Thanks For The Cache.

Placing a trackable into a geocache

Me and my husband have taken up geocaching as a quirky summer hobby. We started last year as a fun way to explore the local area and have just started to do it again this year now the weather is warm again.

This year marks the 15th anniversary of trackable travel bugs when the Geocaching.com founder Jeremy Irish released 7 deadly ducks (based on the 7 deadly sins) into the wild. In honour of the 15th anniversary, the 7 deadly ducks have been reincarnated in a race lasting from 20 July to 20 August (International Geocaching Day) in a competition to see how far these trackable tags travel. So hubby bought the ‘greed’ duck and we have now released him out into the geocaching wilds. I will keep you posted on his progress – wish us luck!

Greed - 7 deadly ducks - geocaching race

Have you taken part in The World’s Largest Treasure Hunt? or are you a Geocaching Muggle? Drop me a line below…